Letters to the Editor: ‘Lessons of history should be remembered in Brexit talks’

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Letters to the Editor: ‘Lessons of history should be remembered in Brexit talks’


'Let the French and Germans reflect on, and act on, that piece of history and accommodate the UK in its not unreasonable desire to maintain, undiminished, its economic and political unity following its exit from the EU' Stock image
‘Let the French and Germans reflect on, and act on, that piece of history and accommodate the UK in its not unreasonable desire to maintain, undiminished, its economic and political unity following its exit from the EU’ Stock image

Reading the letters page in the Irish Independent, there is a sense of deep vitriol being directed personally against the beleaguered Theresa May, for instance ‘The only thing May has achieved is the title of worst British prime minister there’s ever been’ (March 16).

Mrs May’s travails bring to mind the brave struggle of a beleaguered female former British leader, Boadicea, against the then all-powerful Roman Empire, in 60 AD. Ultimately, Boadicea was overrun, but not before she had inflicted terrible devastation on her enemies. Be warned.

It is incomprehensible as to why the Irish, French or even Germans don’t empathise more with the UK in its strong desire to maintain the latter’s economic and political integrity, which is the major outstanding impediment to a clean and mutually beneficial Brexit.

Surely, the Irish, above all others, understand the UK’s stance. How did the Irish react when Ireland was truncated into two parts in the early 20th century?

Like the present day Tories, the Irish turned on one another, though, sadly, the Irish resorted to an irrational physical violence and fought a bloody civil war. The French didn’t like it when they lost Lorraine to Germany in 1871, nor Germany, when losing its eastern part after World War II.

Let the French and Germans reflect on, and act on, that piece of history and accommodate the UK in its not unreasonable desire to maintain, undiminished, its economic and political unity following its exit from the EU.

Micheál O’Cathail

Dún Laoghaire, Dublin

Wales too had a coach on his way out, so it can be no excuse

Noel Mannion is wrong to lay the blame for Ireland’s dismal performance against Wales at the feet of the Irish coach, Joe Schmidt (Letters, March 18).

He posits the view that because the players know this is their last season with the coach, they could hardly be expected to put on their best performance. Does he not know that Wales are in exactly the same situation? Warren Gatland is, too, on the way out.

Games are lost and won by the players on the field. We have had good times (think O’Driscoll, O’Gara and O’Connell) and will again. Right now, we don’t have an Alun Wyn Jones.

Colm McElroy

Santry, Dublin 9

Ill-informed MPs are heading for economic humiliation

Humiliation will come when UK politicians leave the EU, because their economy will need everything it gains from the EU while still in it, and because most of what it gains can’t be got without them there. Will it have any politicians in Asia, Africa, or America?

When extricating from the EU costs more than the UK’s total GDP, it cannot be done without 100pc cast-iron guarantees that the cost can be recovered in a reasonable period and with minimum borrowing, which for an over-borrowed economy is not possible.

An MP who thinks they don’t need the single market, who thinks that shared sovereignty is a penalty and post-Brexit the UK won’t be at the mercy of economies that don’t need anything the UK makes that the EU can’t make cheaper, has to be mentally challenged or very much ill-informed.

Michael McPhillips

Ballymun, Dublin 9

No will exists to put things right for women pensioners

It was sickening to read that once again this lame duck Government is shafting old-age pensioners.

Joan Burton and her advisers decided arbitrarily to deny mostly female pensioners their right to a full pension. 

Now, we have Regina Doherty doing the same. It is an abhorrent way to treat people, especially women who stayed home to raise their children and look after their elderly parents also.

There was no allowance for doing either. None was expected. We lived under the illusion we would be entitled to a full pension, having worked prior to having children and after raising them.

It seems that there is no political will to rectify theft from pensioners.

Eva O’Connor

Crumlin, Dublin

Dubs will be back firing by time All-Ireland day arrives

From reading some of the headlines in the papers, it would seem Dublin football is at an all-time low.

I would not buy in to this. They have lost a few matches and won’t be in the league final, but when championship time comes they will still be hard to beat, and when All-Ireland final day comes I will be surprised if they are not parading in Croke Park. Look out!

John Carney

Roscommon

Irish Independent

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